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The Code Book: The Secret History of Codes and Code-breaking
The Code Book: The Secret History of Codes and Code-breaking
Simon Singh
¥80.25
The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography From the best-selling author of Fermat’s Last Theorem, The Code Book is a history of man’s urge to uncover the secrets of codes, from Egyptian puzzles to modern day computer encryptions. As in Fermat’s Last Theorem, Simon Singh brings life to an anstonishing story of puzzles, codes, languages and riddles that reveals man’s continual pursuit to disguise and uncover, and to work out the secret languages of others. Codes have influenced events throughout history, both in the stories of those who make them and those who break them. The betrayal of Mary Queen of Scots and the cracking of the enigma code that helped the Allies in World War II are major episodes in a continuing history of cryptography. In addition to stories of intrigue and warfare, Simon Singh also investigates other codes, the unravelling of genes and the rediscovery of ancient languages and most tantalisingly, the Beale ciphers, an unbroken code that could hold the key to a $20 million treasure.
Leviathan
Leviathan
Philip Hoare
¥80.25
The story of a man’s obsession with whales, which takes him on a personal, historical and biographical journey – from his childhood to his fascination with Moby-Dick and his excursions whale-watching. All his life, Philip Hoare has been obsessed by whales, from the gigantic skeletons in London’s Natural History Museum to adult encounters with the wild animals themselves. Whales have a mythical quality – they seem to elide with dark fantasies of sea-serpents and antediluvian monsters that swim in our collective unconscious. In ‘Leviathan’, Philip Hoare seeks to locate and identify this obsession. What impelled Melville to write ‘Moby-Dick’? After his book in 1851, no one saw whales in quite the same way again. This book is an investigation into what we know little about – dark, shadowy creatures who swim below the depths, only to surface in a spray of spume. More than the story of the whale, it is also the story of our own obsessions.
New Choices in Natural Healing for Dogs & Cats
New Choices in Natural Healing for Dogs & Cats
Amy Shojai
¥77.86
New Choices in Natural Healing for Dogs & Cats
Churchill’s Black Dog (Text Only)
Churchill’s Black Dog (Text Only)
Anthony Storr
¥76.22
Benjamin Woolley is an award-winning writer and broadcaster. He is the author of the best-selling The Queen's Conjuror: The Life and Magic of Dr John Dee. His first book, Virtual Worlds was short-listed for the Rhone-Poulenc prize and has been translated into eight languages. His second, 'The Bride of Science', examined the life of Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter. He has written and presented documentaries for the BBC on subjects ranging from the fight for liberty during the English Civil War to the end of the Space Age. He has won the Arts Journalist of the Year award and an Emmy for his commentary for Discovery's 'Three Minutes to Impact'. He lives in London.
The Music of the Primes: Why an unsolved problem in mathematics matters (Text On
The Music of the Primes: Why an unsolved problem in mathematics matters (Text On
Marcus du Sautoy
¥73.58
The paperback of the critically-acclaimed popular science book by a writer who is fast becoming a celebrity mathematician. Prime numbers are the very atoms of arithmetic. They also embody one of the most tantalising enigmas in the pursuit of human knowledge. How can one predict when the next prime number will occur? Is there a formula which could generate primes? These apparently simple questions have confounded mathematicians ever since the Ancient Greeks. In 1859, the brilliant German mathematician Bernard Riemann put forward an idea which finally seemed to reveal a magical harmony at work in the numerical landscape. The promise that these eternal, unchanging numbers would finally reveal their secret thrilled mathematicians around the world. Yet Riemann, a hypochondriac and a troubled perfectionist, never publicly provided a proof for his hypothesis and his housekeeper burnt all his personal papers on his death. Whoever cracks Riemann's hypothesis will go down in history, for it has implications far beyond mathematics. In business, it is the lynchpin for security and e-commerce. In science, it has critical ramifications in Quantum Mechanics, Chaos Theory, and the future of computing. Pioneers in each of these fields are racing to crack the code and a prize of $1 million has been offered to the winner. As yet, it remains unsolved. In this breathtaking book, mathematician Marcus du Sautoy tells the story of the eccentric and brilliant men who have struggled to solve one of the biggest mysteries in science. It is a story of strange journeys, last-minute escapes from death and the unquenchable thirst for knowledge. Above all, it is a moving and awe-inspiring evocation of the mathematician's world and the beauties and mysteries it contains.
Inside Story: Politics, Intrigue and Treachery from Thatcher to Brexit
Inside Story: Politics, Intrigue and Treachery from Thatcher to Brexit
Philip Webster
¥73.58
Philip Webster was Political Editor of The Times from 1993 to 2010 having previously been Chief Political Correspondent. Later, As Assistant Editor (Politics), he was in charge of The Times Red Box political website and was the first editor of the ground-breaking Red Box daily briefing email. He became a Lobby correspondent in 1981 after working as a reporter and subeditor on the paper for the previous eight years. He began his career on the Eastern Daily Press in Norwich. He is a lifelong and passionate supporter of Norwich City FC.
Fossils, Finches and Fuegians: Charles Darwin’s Adventures and Discoveries on th
Fossils, Finches and Fuegians: Charles Darwin’s Adventures and Discoveries on th
Richard Keynes
¥73.58
Professor Richard Keynes is the great-grandson of Charles Darwin. A Fellow of the Royal Society since 1959 and a former Professor of Physiology at Cambridge University, Richard Keynes has edited a number of Darwin publications – including The Beagle Record and Charles Darwin’s Beagle Diary. He lives in Cambridge.
Time Travel
Time Travel
James Gleick
¥73.58
JAMES GLEICK (around.com) is our leading chronicler of science and technology, the best-selling author of Chaos: Making a New Science, Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman, and The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. His books have been translated into thirty languages.
RISINGTIDEFALLINGSTAR
RISINGTIDEFALLINGSTAR
Philip Hoare
¥73.58
Philip Hoare is the author of several books, including ‘Serious Pleasures: The Life of Stephen Tennant’; ‘Noel Coward’; ‘Oscar Wilde’s Last Stand’; ‘Spike Island’; ‘England’s Lost Eden’; ‘Leviathan, or, The Whale’, winner of the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction; and ‘The Sea Inside’. He lives in Southampton.
The Planets
The Planets
Dava Sobel
¥73.58
After the huge national and international success of ‘Longitude’ and ‘Gallileo’s Daughter’, Dava Sobel tells the human story of the nine planets of our solar system. This groundbreaking work traces the ‘lives’ of each member of our solar family, from myth and history, astrology and science fiction, to the latest data from the modern era's robotic space probes. Whether revealing what hides behind Venus's cocoon of acid clouds, describing Neptune's complex beauty, or capturing first-hand the excitement at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory when the first pictures from Cassini at Saturn were recently beamed to earth, Dava Sobel's unique tour of the solar system is filled with fascination and beauty. In lyrical prose interspersed with poems by Tennyson, Blake and others, ‘The Planets’ gives a breathtaking, intimate view of those heavenly bodies that have captured the imagination since humanity’s first glimpse of the glittering night skies. Timely and timeless, ‘The Planets’ will engage and delight as it unravels the mysteries of the cosmos. It is of infinite relevance to this age in which new planets are being discovered elsewhere in our galaxy. Note that it has not been possible to include the same picture content that appeared in the original print version.
Fermat’s Last Theorem
Fermat’s Last Theorem
Simon Singh
¥73.58
I have a truly marvellous demonstration of this proposition which this margin is too narrow to contain.' It was with these words, written in the 1630s, that Pierre de Fermat intrigued and infuriated the mathematics community. For over 350 years, proving Fermat's Last Theorem was the most notorious unsolved mathematical problem, a puzzle whose basics most children could grasp but whose solution eluded the greatest minds in the world. In 1993, after years of secret toil, Englishman Andrew Wiles announced to an astounded audience that he had cracked Fermat's Last Theorem. He had no idea of the nightmare that lay ahead. In 'Fermat's Last Theorem' Simon Singh has crafted a remarkable tale of intellectual endeavour spanning three centuries, and a moving testament to the obsession, sacrifice and extraordinary determination of Andrew Wiles: one man against all the odds.
The Wood for the Trees: The Long View of Nature from a Small Wood
The Wood for the Trees: The Long View of Nature from a Small Wood
Richard Fortey
¥73.58
From one of our greatest science writers, this biography of a beech-and-bluebell wood through diverse moods and changing seasons combines stunning natural history with the ancient history of the countryside to tell the full story of the British landscape. ‘The woods are the great beauty of this country… A fine forest-like beech wood far more beautiful than anything else which we have seen in its vicinity’ is how John Stuart Mill described a small patch of beech-and bluebell woodland, buried deeply in the Chiltern Hills and now owned by Richard Fortey. Drawing upon a lifetime of scientific expertise and abiding love of nature, Fortey uses his small wood to tell a wider story of the ever-changing British landscape, human influence on the countryside over many centuries and the vital interactions between flora, fauna and fungi. The trees provide a majestic stage for woodland animals and plants to reveal their own stories. Fortey presents his wood as an interwoven collection of different habitats rich in species. His attention ranges from the beech and cherry trees that dominate the wood to the flints underfoot; the red kites and woodpeckers that soar overhead; the lichens, mosses and liverworts decorating the branches as well as the myriad species of spiders, moths, beetles and crane-flies. The 300 species of fungi identified in the wood capture his attention as much as familiar deer, shrews and dormice. Fortey is a naturalist who believes that all organisms are as interesting as human beings – and certainly more important than the observer. So this book is a close examination of nature and human history. He proves that poetic writing is compatible with scientific precision. The book is filled with details of living animals and plants, charting the passage of the seasons, visits by fellow enthusiasts; the play of light between branches; the influence of geology; and how woodland influences history, architecture and industry. On every page he shows how an intimate study of one small wood can reveal so much about the natural world and demonstrates his relish for the incomparable pleasures of discovery.
Why Us?: How Science Rediscovered the Mystery of Ourselves (Text Only)
Why Us?: How Science Rediscovered the Mystery of Ourselves (Text Only)
James Le Fanu
¥73.58
The imperative to 'know thyself' is both fundamental and profoundly elusive – for how can we ever truly comprehend the drama and complexity of the human experience? In ‘Why Us?’ James Le Fanu offers a fascinating exploration of the power and limits of science to penetrate the deep mysteries of our existence, challenging the certainty that has persisted since Charles Darwin's Origin of Species that we are no more than the fortuitous consequence of a materialist evolutionary process. That challenge arises, unexpectedly, from the two major projects that promised to provide definitive proof for this most influential of scientific theories. The first is the astonishing achievement of the Human Genome Project, which, it was anticipated, would identify the genetic basis of those characteristics that distinguish humans from their primate cousins. The second is the phenomenal advance in brain imaging that now permits neuroscientists to observe the brain 'in action' and thus account for the remarkable properties of the human mind. But that is not how it has turned out. It is simply not possible to get from the monotonous sequence of genes along the Double Helix to the near infinite diversity of the living world, nor to translate the electrical firing of the brain into the creativity of the human mind. This is not a matter of not knowing all the facts. Rather, science has inadvertently discovered that its theories are insufficient to conjure the wonder of the human experience from the bare bones of our genes and brains. We stand on the brink of a tectonic shift in our understanding of ourselves that will witness the rediscovery of the central premise of Western philosophy that there is 'more than we can know'. Lucid, compelling and utterly engaging, ‘Why Us?’ offers a convincing and provocative vision of the new science of being human.
Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life
Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life
Peter Godfrey-Smith
¥73.58
Peter Godfrey-Smith is a distinguished professor of history and the philosophy of science at the University of Sydney. He is the author of four books, including Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, which won the 2010 Lakatos Award for an outstanding work on the philosophy of science. His underwater videos of octopuses have been featured in National Geographic and New Scientist.
Secrets of the Human Body
Secrets of the Human Body
Chris van Tulleken,Xand van Tulleken
¥73.58
Chris van Tulleken trained in medicine in Oxford and is a Member of the Royal College of Physicians. He has a diploma in Tropical Medicine from the London School of Tropical Medicine and after more than a decade working in the NHS he is now doing a PhD in Molecular Virology under the supervision of Greg Towers at UCL. Xand van Tulleken has a diploma in Tropical Medicine, a Diploma in International Humanitarian Assistance and a Master’s in Public Health from Harvard, where he was a Fulbright Scholar. He is a contributing editor to the first edition of the Oxford Handbook of Humanitarian Medicine and has worked for Doctors of the World, Merlin and the World Health Organisation in humanitarian crises around the world. Chris and Xand have worked on a number of projects together, including Operation Ouch!, a 2x BAFTA-winning children’s health show on CBBC. Additionally, the two have collaborated on Horizon: Fat vs Sugar, Horizon: Is Binge Drinking Really That Bad for You?, The Secret Life of Twins and Operation Ouch: Blow Your Mind. And in their younger and slightly fuller-haired days, Chris and Xand starred in a series called Medicine Men Go Wild, a show in which they did, in fact, go wild. Andrew Cohen is Head of the BBC Science Unit and the Executive Producer of the BBC series Secrets of the Human Body. He has been responsible for a wide range of science documentaries including Horizon, the Wonders trilogy, Stargazing Live and Human Universe. He lives in London with his wife and three children.
Music and the Mind
Music and the Mind
Anthony Storr
¥73.58
The editor, Anthony Storr, is a doctor, psychiatrist and analyst (trained in the school of C.G.) and author of 'Jung' (a Fontana Modern Master,1973) amongst many others.
Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong – and the New Research That’s Rewriting Th
Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong – and the New Research That’s Rewriting Th
Angela Saini
¥73.58
Angela Saini is an award-winning science journalist, author and broadcaster.
The Secret Life of the Mind: How Our Brain Thinks, Feels and Decides
The Secret Life of the Mind: How Our Brain Thinks, Feels and Decides
Mariano Sigman
¥73.58
Mariano Sigman, a physicist by training, is an international leading figure in the cognitive neuroscience of learning and decision making. He is the founder of the Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Buenos Aires. Sigman is the only Latin American scientist to be a director of the Human Brain Project, was awarded a Human Frontiers Career Development Award, the National Prize of Pphysics, the Young Investigator Prize of "College de France," the IBM Scalable Data Analytics Award, and is a scholar of the James S. McDonnell Foundation.
The Glass Universe
The Glass Universe
Dava Sobel
¥73.58
‘A biographical orrery – intricate, complex and fascinating’ The Observer ‘A peerless intellectual biography. The Glass Universe shines and twinkles as brightly as the stars themselves’ The Economist #1 New York Times bestselling author Dava Sobel returns with a captivating, little-known true story of women in science Before they even had the right to vote, a group of remarkable women were employed by Harvard College Observatory as ‘Human Computers’ to interpret the observations made via telescope by their male counterparts each night. The author of Longitude, Galileo’s Daughter and The Planets shines light on the hidden history of these extraordinary women who changed the burgeoning field of astronomy and our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe.
Ebola ’76
Ebola ’76
Amir Tag Elsir
¥73.49
Louis Nawa left the hospital, still wearing his inpatient's gown, which covered only the top half of his body, leaving the bottom half naked but for a thick coat of body hair, a few mosquito bites and a wealth of lesions left by Ebola, which were now beginning to heal over. The streets were dusty, baking in the midday August sun... Ebola's tragic victims were evident all around. With no one left to carry them, they crawled alone to the main square in the hope of finding help. Louis, meanwhile, was completely oblivious to his bare feet, already blistering as they pounded the baking road. Any feeling including that of a guilty conscience had been entirely deadened by the bottle of wine he had guzzled. By acclaimed Sudanese author Amir Tag Elsir, Ebola '76 follows the story of Louis, a?simple blue-collar worker who unwittingly transports a deadly disease back to his home?country, with disastrous consequences for his family, friends and colleagues alike. In?a series of bizarre and comical human encounters, the disease takes a firm hold of?the city of Anzara. Blind guitar players, comely barbers, tyrannical factory owners and?spurned wives all soon find themselves desperately fighting for their lives in the "Time?of Ebola". Among the novel's most unusual characters is Ebola itself, a strikingly dark and sinister?presence that haunts the pages of this fast-paced, tragicomic satire. Cackling with?glee, hovering in drops of spittle, and gliding slyly from body to body, Ebola represents?one of the evilest and unpredictable of villains.
Cosmoza. Iubirea cosmic?
Cosmoza. Iubirea cosmic?
Petreșteanu Elena
¥73.49
O investiga?ie ?tiin?ific? pentru ?n?elegerea ?i ?mbun?t??irea capacit??ii min?iiViitorul min?ii umane aduce un subiect rezervat c?ndva exclusiv domeniului science-fiction ?ntr-o realitate nou? ?i surprinz?toare. Acest tur de for?? ?tiin?ific dezv?luie cercet?rile uimi?toare care se efectueaz? ?n laboratoa?rele de top din lumea ?ntreag? – toate baz?ndu-se pe ultimele descoperiri din neuro?tiin?? ?i fizic? – incluz?nd expe?rimente recente ?n telepatie, controlul min?ii, telechinezie ?i ?nregistrarea amintirilor ?i a visurilor.Lectura acestei c?r?i este o aventur? uimitoare nu doar pentru fanii SF, ci ?i pentru pasiona?ii de fizic?, medicin?, neuro?tiin??, care vor descoperi aici vastele posibilit??i ale creierului uman.?Kaku are darul de a explica idei incredibil de complexe ?ntr-un limbaj pe care-l poate ?n?elege ?i un cititor neavizat." - San Francisco Chronicle
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