万本电子书0元读

万本电子书0元读

Raphael - Volume 2
Raphael - Volume 2
Müntz, Eugène
¥159.33
Raphael (1483-1520), the Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance, was a genius in and ahead of his time. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he formed the classical trinity of this era and elaborated a rich style of harmony and geometry. As one of the great masters of the Renaissance and artist to European royalty and the Papal court in Rome, his works comprise various themes of theology and philosophy, including but not limited to famous illustrations of the Madonna. His surroundings and experience gave rise to his propensity to combine the ideals of humanism with those of religion, and firmly established in him a conviction that art is a necessary medium to reveal the beauty of nature.
Only Fools and Horses (The Best of British Comedy)
Only Fools and Horses (The Best of British Comedy)
Richard Webber
¥50.62
Richard Webber writes regulary about TV in his job as a journalist and writer. He contributes to a host of newspapers and magazines, including TV Quick, Daily Express, Sunday Express and the Sunday Telegraph and is the author of over a dozen books celebrating classic comedy.
Poet's Freedom
Poet's Freedom
Stewart, Susan
¥229.55
Why do we need new artHow free is the artist in makingAnd why is the artist, and particularly the poet, a figure of freedom in Western cultureThe MacArthur Award-winning poet and critic Susan Stewart ponders these questions in The Poet's Freedom. Through a series of evocative essays, she not only argues that freedom is necessary to making and is itself something made, but also shows how artists give rules to their practices and model a self-determination that might serve in other spheres of work.Stewart traces the ideas of freedom and making through insightful readings of an array of Western philosophers and poets-Plato, Homer, Marx, Heidegger, Arendt, Dante, and Coleridge are among her key sources. She begins by considering the theme of making in the Hebrew Scriptures, examining their accountof a god who creates the world and leaves humans free to rearrange and reform the materials of nature. She goes on to follow the force of moods, sounds, rhythms, images, metrical rules, rhetorical traditions, the traps of the passions, and the nature of language in the cycle of making and remaking. Throughout the book she weaves the insight that the freedom to reverse any act of artistic making is as essential as the freedom to create.?A book about the pleasures of making and thinking as means of life, The Poet's Freedom explores and celebrates the freedom of artists who, working under finite conditions, make considered choices and shape surprising consequences. This engaging and beautifully written notebook on making will attract anyone interested in the creation of art and literature.
A Grammar of Murder
A Grammar of Murder
Karla Oeler
¥282.53
The dark shadows and offscreen space that force us to imagine violence we cannot see. The real slaughter of animals spliced with the fictional killing of men. The missing countershot from the murder victim's point of view. Such images, or absent images, Karla Oeler contends, distill how the murder scene challenges and changes film.?Reexamining works by such filmmakers as Renoir, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Jarmusch, and Eisenstein, Oeler traces the murder scene's intricate connections to the great breakthroughs in the theory and practice of montage and the formulation of the rules and syntax of Hollywood genre. She argues that murder plays such a central role in film because it mirrors, on multiple levels, the act of cinematic representation. Death and murder at once eradicate life and call attention to its former existence, just as cinema conveys both the reality and the absence of the objects it depicts. But murder shares with cinema not only this interplay between presence and absence, movement and stillness: unlike death, killing entails the deliberate reduction of a singular subject to a disposable object. Like cinema, it involves a crucial choice about what to cut and what to keep.
Sorcery in the Black Atlantic
Sorcery in the Black Atlantic
Luis Nicolau Parés,Roger Sansi
¥253.10
Girls abused in London and torsos of black boys found in the Thames; African boys disappearing from school and child traffic in Africa; child sacrifice and Brazilian Pentecostal exorcism. Unrelated events are swiftly connected in an uncanny work of prestidigitation, including hitech digital images of torsos and forensic drawings of abused children. Les correspondances symboliques, Baudelaire would say, or contiguous magic, in Frazer’s more prosaic de*ion. It all could make sense, if we believe in our fears, suspicions, gossip, and prejudices. Furthermore, this incredible work of prestidigitation was engineered by two respectable institutions, known for their enlightened search of truth: the BBC and Scotland Yard. But where was the evidence that all these things were connectedThe “exorcism scandal” bewitched the media in Britain for the whole month of June, until some dissenting voices started to talk about a “racist witch hunt.” 5 By then, however, a population of hundreds of thousands of Africans, in particular Pentecostal Africans, was already under suspicion. “What if some of that was true?” some people still may ask. In fact, shortly before completing this introduction, the local London newspaper Evening Standard published a two-page report on an African church in the United Kingdom, with the title “Miracles and claims of baby-snatching,” mixing rumors of child trafficking, sorcery, syncretism, and extreme wealth. 6 That is how sorcery works: not by fully demonstrating its power, but by opening a possible doubt; one is never fully sure it is not true.
Degas
Degas
Brodskaya, Nathalia
¥40.79
Degas was closest to Renoir in the impressionist’s circle, for both favoured the animated Parisian life of their day as a motif in their paintings. Degas did not attend Gleyre’s studio; most likely he first met the future impressionists at the Café Guerbois. He started his apprenticeship in 1853 at the studio of Louis-Ernest Barrias and, beginning in 1854, studied under Louis Lamothe, who revered Ingres above all others, and transmitted his adoration for this master to Edgar Degas. Starting in 1854 Degas travelled frequently to Italy: first to Naples, where he made the acquaintance of his numerous cousins, and then to Rome and Florence, where he copied tirelessly from the Old Masters. His drawings and sketches already revealed very clear preferences: Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Mantegna, but also Benozzo Gozzoli, Ghirlandaio, Titian, Fra Angelico, Uccello, and Botticelli. During the 1860s and 1870s he became a painter of racecourses, horses and jockeys. His fabulous p
Mondrian
Mondrian
Calosse, Jp. A.
¥40.79
Piet Mondrian (1872-1944), who can be assigned to the school of classical modernism, was born in Amersfort, Netherlands. After studying in Amsterdam, he started his artist?s career in the impressionist style as a figure and landscape painter. His works from these years showed the influence of Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) and of Fauvism, a French school from the beginning of the 20th century. When he traveled to Paris in 1911, he discovered Pablo Picasso?s works (1881-1973) and, with that, Cubism. He thereafter became a pioneer of abstract painting in the Netherlands. From the 1920s on, his paintings show a vertical and horizontal composition that, combined with the oppositions of blue, yellow, red, and noncolored spaces, turned into his trademark. His art was very appreciated in New York, where he spent his last years. Mondrian was not only a painter but also an art theoretician and cofounder of the art school De Stijl.
Toulouse-Lautrec
Toulouse-Lautrec
Brodskaya, Nathalia
¥40.79
Lautrec studied with two of the most admired academic painters of the day, Léon Bonnat and Fernand Cormon. Lautrec’s time in the studios of Bonnat and Cormon had the advantage of introducing him to the nude as a subject. At that time life-drawing of the nude was the basis of all academic art training in nineteenth-century Paris. While still a student, Lautrec began to explore Parisian nightlife, which was to provide him with his greatest inspiration, and eventually undermined his health. Lautrec was an artist able to stamp his vision of the age in which he lived upon the imagination of future generations. Just as we see the English court of Charles I through the eyes of van Dyck and the Paris of Louis-Philippe through the eyes of Daumier, so we see the Paris of the 1890s and its most colourful personalities, through the eyes of Lautrec. The first great personality of Parisian nightlife whom Lautrec encountered – and a man who was to play an important role in helping Lautrec develop his
Whistler
Whistler
Calosse, Jp. A.
¥40.79
Whistler suddenly shot to fame like a meteor at a crucial moment in the history of art, a field in which he was a pioneer. Like the impressionists, with whom he sided, he wanted to impose his own ideas. Whistler’s work can be divided into four periods. The first may be called a period of research in which he was influenced by the Realism of Gustave Courbet and by Japanese art. Whistler then discovered his own originality in the Nocturnes and the Cremorne Gardens series, thereby coming into conflict with the academics who wanted a work of art to tell a story. When he painted the portrait of his mother, Whistler entitled it Arrangement in Grey and Black and this is symbolic of his aesthetic theories. When painting the Cremorne Pleasure Gardens it was not to depict identifiable figures, as did Renoir in his work on similar themes, but to capture an atmosphere. He loved the mists that hovered over the banks of the Thames, the pale light, and the factory chimneys which at night turned into
Kahlo
Kahlo
Souter, Gerry
¥40.79
在弗里达·卡罗(Frida?Kahlo)的自画像背后,是她一生的故事。也正是因此,读者会被这本画集所深深吸引。弗里达的作品是她生命的记录,很少有艺术家如同弗里达一样,能够让我们从画框之间获得如此多的东西。弗里达·卡罗确实是墨西哥艺术史的礼物。当她年仅十八岁的时候,一场严重的车祸永远地改变了她的生命,她自此以后被残疾和频繁的疼痛所困扰。但是弗里达那火爆的个性、天然的决心和勤奋的工作造就了她的艺术才能。即使是花花公子的伟大画家迭戈·里维拉(Diego Rivera)也深深迷恋着她。弗里达靠自身的魅力、才能和智慧赢得了迭戈·里维拉,她也学会了依靠里维拉的成功来探索世界,从而在一群紧密的友人之中创造了自己独特的风格。她的私生活极其混乱,一方面她常常摆脱与迭戈的关系,另一方面她也深陷双性恋之中。不仅如此,弗里达和迭戈还不断拯救着他们之间分崩离析的关系。弗里达留给我们的故事和绘画作品为我们诠释了一个女人不断发现自我的勇者历程。
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Müntz, Eugène
¥40.79
米开朗基罗(Michelangelo)的名字不断浮现在西斯廷教堂、阿波罗、丘比特等数不计数的杰作中。在《意大利绘画》(The Italian Painting)这本书中,作者司汤达写道:“在古希腊风物和米开朗基罗之间,没有任何距离,除了或多或少技术娴熟的伪造物。”在《漫步罗马》(Promenade in Rome)一书中,沙特布莱表达了对《圣母怜子像》(Pieta)中那些精致的线条的崇敬之情。诸如司汤达等大连古欧秀的作家将米开朗基罗视为西方艺术复兴的大家之一。毫无疑问,米开朗基罗的作品经历住了时间的考验。在若干年后,米开朗基罗的作品何以能够揭示希腊先驱们的创造性来源?米开朗基罗是创造性的天才和超人,是意大利文艺复兴中无与伦比的艺术家,他的影响力和成就与达芬奇可相媲美。在这本著作中, Jean-Matthieu Gosselin探讨了米开朗基罗所有的身份:雕塑家、建筑师、画家和美术家。
O'Keeffe
O'Keeffe
Souter, Gerry
¥40.79
In 1905 Georgia travelled to Chicago to study painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1907 she enrolled at the Art Students’ League in New York City, where she studied with William Merritt Chase. During her time in New York she became familiar with the 291 Gallery owned by her future husband, photographer Alfred Stieglitz. In 1912, she and her sisters studied at university with Alon Bement, who employed a somewhat revolutionary method in art instruction originally conceived by Arthur Wesley Dow. In Bement’s class, the students did not mechanically copy nature, but instead were taught the principles of design using geometric shapes. They worked at exercises that included dividing a square, working within a circle and placing a rectangle around a drawing, then organising the composition by rearranging, adding or eliminating elements. It sounded dull and to most students it was. But Georgia found that these studies gave art its structure and helped her understand the basics of abstra
Pollock
Pollock
Wigal, Donald
¥40.79
Born in 1912, in a small town in Wyoming, Jackson Pollock embodied the American dream as the country found itself confronted with the realities of a modern era replacing the fading nineteenth century. Pollock left home in search of fame and fortune in New York City. Thanks to the Federal Art Project he quickly won acclaim, and after the Second World War became the biggest art celebrity in America. For De Kooning, Pollock was the “icebreaker”. For Max Ernst and Masson, Pollock was a fellow member of the European Surrealist movement. And for Motherwell, Pollock was a legitimate candidate for the status of the Master of the American School. During the many upheavals in his life in Nez York in the 1950s and 60s, Pollock lost his bearings - success had simply come too fast and too easily. It was during this period that he turned to alcohol and disintegrated his marriage to Lee Krasner. His life ended like that of 50s film icon James Dean behind the wheel of his Oldsmobile, after a night of
Picasso
Picasso
Charles, Victoria
¥61.23
Picasso was born a Spaniard and, so they say, began to draw before he could speak. As an infant he was instinctively attracted to artist’s tools. In early childhood he could spend hours in happy concentration drawing spirals with a sense and meaning known only to himself. At other times, shunning children’s games, he traced his first pictures in the sand. This early self-expression held out promise of a rare gift. Málaga must be mentioned, for it was there, on 25 October 1881, that Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born and it was there that he spent the first ten years of his life. Picasso’s father was a painter and professor at the School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Picasso learnt from him the basics of formal academic art training. Then he studied at the Academy of Arts in Madrid but never finished his degree. Picasso, who was not yet eighteen, had reached the point of his greatest rebelliousness; he repudiated academia’s anemic aesthetics along with realism’s pedestrian prose and, quite naturall
Bonnard
Bonnard
Brodskaya, Natalia
¥61.23
Pierre Bonnard was the leader of a group of Post-Impressionist painters who called themselves the Nabis, from the Hebrew word meaning “prophet”. Bonnard, Vuillard, Roussel and Denis, the most distinguished of the Nabis, revolutionised decorative painting during one of the richest periods in the history of French painting. Bonnard’s works are striking for their strong colours and candidness.
Cassatt
Cassatt
Brodskaya, Natalia
¥61.23
Mary was born in Pittsburgh. Her father was a banker of liberal educational ideas and the entire family appears to have been sympathetic to French culture. Mary was no more than five or six years old when she first saw Paris, and she was still in her teens when she decided to become a painter. She went to Italy, on to Antwerp, then to Rome, andfinally returned to Paris where in 1874, she permanently settled. In 1872, Cassatt sent her first work to the Salon, others followed in the succeeding years until 1875, when a portrait of her sister was rejected. She divined that the jury had not been satisfied with the background, so she re-painted it several times until, in the next Salon, the same portrait was accepted. At this moment Degas asked her to exhibit with him and his friends, the Impressionist Group, then rising into view, and she accepted with joy. She admired Manet, Courbet and Degas, and hated conventional art. Cassatt’s biographer stressed the intellectuality and sentiment app
Icons
Icons
Milyayeva, Lyudmila
¥61.23
This book analyses the evolution of iconic art from its beginning in Byzantium to the time of the Russian Empire. Icons are a fundamental element in the history of art, and it is therefore crucial to understand how this form of expression began and how it developed over centuries. Icons are discussed by one of the world-renowned experts on early Christian iconography, offering a valuable point of reference for specialists, as well as students.
Historic Maritime Maps
Historic Maritime Maps
Wigal, Donald
¥61.23
In the Middle Ages, navigation relied upon a delicate balance between art and science. Whilst respecting the customs and the precautions of their forbearers, sailors had to count on their knowledge of the stars, the winds, the currents, and even of migratory flights. They also used hand-painted maps, which, although certainly summary, were marvellously well-drawn. In following the saga of old sailors, from Eric Le Rouge to Robert Peary, Donald Wigal leads us in discovering the New World. This magnificent overview of maps dating from the 10th to the 18th centuries, often ‘primitive’ and sometimes difficult to understand, retraces the progress of cartography and shows the incredible courage of men who endeavoured to conquer the seas with tools whose geographical accuracy often left much to be desired.
Hiroshige
Hiroshige
Uspensky, Mikhail
¥61.23
如果迷人的“日出之国”不幸在火山喷发之中沉入大洋之底,它仍然将活在歌川广重(Utagawa Hiroshige)那神奇的画笔之下。通过欣赏他的风景画,想象的光之翼将我们带领到阵雨和黎明的国度——仿佛是在彩虹跌落在人间,散成了千万个棱镜的仙境之中——水流缓缓流向地平线,水仙花散布其间。 这本书宛如一条通向永恒的艺术的小道,凸显了自然之美,无人出其右,令人难忘怀。
Sargent
Sargent
Wigal, Donald
¥61.23
Sargent was born in Florence, in 1856, the son of cultivated parents. When Sargent entered the school of Carolus-Duran he attained much more than the average pupils. His father was a retired Massachusetts gentleman, having practised medicine in Philadelphia. Sargent’s home life was penetrated with refinement, and outside it were the beautiful influences of Florence, combining the charms of sky and hills with the wonders of art in the galleries and the opportunities of an intellectual and artistic society. Accordingly, when Sargent arrived in Paris, he was not only a skilful draughtsman and painter as a result of his study of the Italian masters, but he also had a refined and cultivated taste, which perhaps had an even greater influence upon his career. Later in Spain, it was chiefly upon the lessons learned from Velázquez that he found his own brilliant method. Sargent belongs to America, but is claimed by others as a citizen of the world, or a cosmopolitan. Sargent, with the exception
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Lahor, Jean
¥61.23
作为对工业革命的回应,新艺术运动以装饰和建筑风格发端。新艺术运动初的目标是通过回归自然主题,创造新的自然美学。该运动中的设计常常伴有植物图案和高度风格化、反大起大落曲线的细致刻画,是谓之新艺术风格。 为了达到该目标,诸如古斯塔夫克林姆(Gustav Klimt)、科罗曼穆塞尔(Koloman Moser)、安东尼高迪(Antoni Gaudi)、扬托罗普(Jan Toorop)、威廉莫里斯(William Morris)等艺术家更加偏爱技术创新和形式新颖。新艺术运动试图将艺术融合进生活的所有侧面,从物质的家具到家中的装饰物品再到建筑物;建立在艺术与日常生活相融合的艺术哲学之上。1900年在巴黎世界博览会大获成功之后,这一趋势继续流行且营销了不少艺术家以及装饰艺术运动。新艺术运动的继承者在次世界大战之后依然层出不穷。所以说新艺术运动时装饰艺术“文艺复兴”的核心,一点都不为过。
2 3 4 5 6 7 8